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Principles of approach (manifesto) updated

December 2, 2010

I direly hate the word “manifesto” (at least in this context) so am struggling with what to title this. Blergh. Anyways, I’ve updated and probably now just need outside eyes. I want to be succinct, serious, but light all at once. I wonder whether I shouldn’t depersonalize it more, take out all “my’s” etc. Unclear.

 

 

Principles of Approach

1. Above all, make beautiful things.

2. Make things that function and do what they’re supposed to do.

3. Make things that work superficially: something you want to touch, approach, poke, click on, would like having on your walls, would like having on your coffee table, would pause on for a second when clicking around with the remote, want to hear more of, want to show your kids/parents/husband. Etc, etc, etc.

4. Make things that work in surprising and unexpected ways.

5. But that don’t need external training to use/operate/decode/understand. Make objects that work on at least some of their levels without needing to be spoken about.

6. Make objects that are honest. And work honestly. This can be broadly interpreted, for better or worse. It might mean: don’t use a nostalgic look just for the sake of it; it might mean: don’t make something dirty in Photoshop—make it dirty yourself. It might mean: the surprising, clever aspect of the thing you’ve made is completely inappropriate to the idea and should be scrapped.

7. We are all your parents. Don’t you want your mother to understand what you’re doing? Be nice to the audience. Be as accessible as you can.

8. In a similar vein, talk about your work as if you were talking to your mom. If you’re using big words, you’ve probably already lost.

9. Simplicity is key. If there are more than, say, three moving parts, you’ve already lost. The thing should be beautiful and smart and so, so, so light and simple….

 

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